Antigone Board Game

Places: Palace, cave, Polyneice’s burial grounds, guard station, in front of the palace

People: Creon, Haemon, Ismene, Antigone, Guard, Chorus

Reason: Loyalty, power, civil disobedience, feminist views, guilt, devotion to family

Instructions

Set Up: Three cards should be placed inside the envelope given- one place, one piece of evidence, and one person, which will eventually answer the question who? what? and where? to investigate who is to blame for the death of Antigone. Then, every player should receive one of each card, a game piece, as well as a sheet of the notepad included in the game. Don’t let anyone else see your cards! Use the notepad to check off the cards you received, and to check off other discoveries you make throughout the game.

How To Play: You begin playing by putting your token, which represents your character, on a start space closest to you. One person goes first and rolls the die given.

When you enter a place, make a proposition of who you believe could have possibly killed Antigone. Make sure to consider yourself as a suspect and to propose the place you are in within your proposition! For example: Let’s say you are Creon and you have entered the Castle. You can say, “I propose the Guard is to blame for Antigone’s death. The Guard was in the Castle and felt he had too much power,” as long as you haven’t checked any of the places, people, or evidence you mention off of your notepad.

The player on the left of the person who has just proposed opposes the proposal first. If they have one, or more, of the cards mentioned, they secretly show the proposer one of the cards. When this happens, make sure to check off the card on your notepad! If no one can show you a card from your proposal, you can either make your allegation now, or end your turn.

To make an allegation, you state where, what, and who you think should be blamed for killing Antigone, when it’s your turn. You can only make one allegation during the game! To check if you allegation is correct, take the cards out of the envelope and see if they match up. If your allegation is incorrect, put the cards back, and now you must stop playing the game.

Artist’s Statement

I am creating a board game to figure out who is to blame for Antigone’s death. You can almost take any character from Antigone and find a way to blame them for her death, so I decided to create a board game based on Clue to decide this once and for all, or multiple times depending on how many times the game is played. A person, a reason, and a place are going to blamed at the end of the board game, for example, Creon, power, and at Polyneice’s burial grounds.

I want people to have a deeper view of the play, rather than just understanding the plot of Antigone. By playing this board game, the players can understand that any of the characters can be blamed for her death. Also, the players can begin to understand more of the play’s major themes because the reason given is a theme of the play, and they can try to connect the blamed character with that theme, or with another theme. I also want the players be able to see from other points of view. Seeing from other perspectives, or other character’s perspectives in this case, is incredibly important in the real world, so hopefully this game can contribute and carry over to the real world after the game is played.

I was influenced by the thought that anyone could be blamed for Antigone’s death as well as the thought of a board game- why not put them together? I was also influenced by the main ideas of Antigone. The board game revolves around those ideas because they put the “why?” in who is to blame for Antigone’s death. If the person who “killed” Antigone is discovered, it will come with why. Loyalty? Feminism? etc.

Final Product

(shown with examples of the cards and notepad)

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Antigone Board Game Draft

My Antigone board game is based off of “Clue.” This is a draft of the instructions and of the game board.

Places: Palace, cave, Polyneice’s burial ground, guard station, in front of the palace

People: Creon, Haemon, Ismene, Antigone, Guard, Chorus

Reason: Loyalty, power, civil disobedience, feminist views, guilt, devotion to family

Instructions

Set Up: Three cards should be placed inside the envelope given- one place, one piece of evidence, and one person, which will eventually answer the question who? what? and where? to investigate who is to blame for the death of Antigone. Then, every player should receive one of each card, a game piece, as well as a sheet of the notepad included in the game. Don’t let anyone else see your cards! Use the notepad to check off the cards you received, and to check off other discoveries you make throughout the game.

How To Play:

You begin playing by putting your token, which represents your character, on a start space closest to you. One person goes first and rolls the die given.

When you enter a place, make a proposition of who you believe could have possibly killed Antigone. Make sure to consider yourself as a suspect and to propose the place you are in within your proposition! For example: Let’s say you are Creon and you have entered the Castle. You can say, “I propose the Guard is to blame for Antigone’s death. The Guard was in the Castle and felt he had too much power,” as long as you haven’t checked any of the places, people, or evidence you mention off of your notepad.

The player on the left of the person who has just proposed opposes the proposal first. If they have one, or more, of the cards mentioned, they secretly show the proposer one of the cards. When this happens, make sure to check off the card on your notepad! If no one can show you a card from your proposal, you can either make your allegation now, or end your turn.

To make an allegation, you state where, what, and who you think should be blamed for killing Antigone, when it’s your turn. You can only make one allegation during the game! To check if you allegation is correct, take the cards out of the envelope and see if they match up. If your allegation is incorrect, put the cards back, and now you must stop playing the game.

Game Board

FullSizeRender

OPTICC Second Six Weeks

queen-isabella-procession-harley4379Introduction: This painting is representative of this time period because it shows Queen Isabella of France returning to her castle. This painting shows a city greeting their queen, which communicates to the viewer how the societies respected and greeted royalty. It is important that people view this art piece so they can understand the deeper meaning of the painting. The painting shows inequalities at the time between royalty and civilians, and men and women, yet it also shows an extremely powerful queen that doesn’t live up to the stereotypical “weak” woman. This painting is relevant today because it shows we have come a long way equality-wise, but we still have a ways to go.

Overview: The painting looks as though it popped out of a picture book, with a painting at the top and words underneath with decor and design that fills all of the empty space. The painting shows Queen Isabella of France, mentioned above, being carried through the town to a palace on a carriage. There is royalty walking on all sides of the carriage, and a religious figure, possibly the Pope, is greeting the queen at the gateway to the castle. There are civilians standing to the right and on a ledge above the queen to greet her into the palace. The castle is also pictured in the painting, with intricate towers and window designs.

Parts: A few noticeably important details of the painting are the many fleur-de-lis, where the men and women are painted in the picture, as well as where the eyes in the people of the painting are focused. The fleur-de-lis represent French royalty, perfection, light, and life, which makes sense in this painting since they are welcoming a French queen to the castle. The men and women are separated in the picture, which shows inequality in this time period. The art piece conveys that the men had more privileges than the women, since they are able to stand closer to royalty, even though they are only civilians. The last detail I noticed was where the eyes of the people in the painting are focused. This was a common element artists use in their paintings to highlight an important person or thing in the painting. In this case, the queen is being highlighted.

Title: The title of this piece is Jean Froissart, Chroniques (the ‘Harley Froissart’). The title gives the artist’s name as well as where the art piece originated. Jean Froissart, Chroniques are chronicles of the Hundred Years’ War. This automatically causes me to infer that Queen Isabella of France had something to do with the Hundred Years’ War, which, in fact, she helped initiate.

Interpretation: In the historical context, Queen Isabella of France is likely returning home with many questions to answer about the Hundred Years’ War. The piece also seemed to be trying to portray the idea of how societies greeted their queen as well as how the people of the societies interacted with one another- the royalty and civilians, and the men and women.

Context: The context of this piece is during the Hundred Years’ War. Many people were most likely confused and needed to ask many questions of Queen Isabella. People were awaiting her arrival and were very excited to see her so their questions could be answered. The people aren’t necessarily rejoicing over the fact that she is back, but they are, in no doubt, glad she has arrived to help guide them through the war.

Conclusion: This painting represents a medieval society greeting their leader after learning about a new war that has been waged. The painting is important to what we are studying because it can give us visual insight into the Hundred Years’ War, as well as Queen Isabella of France, which we have yet to learn about. It can also teach us how societies greet their leaders in medieval times, along with the inequalities that come along with greeting their leaders.